Prosthodontics in Conditions

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Abfraction

Abfractions are small notches located just above or below the gum line. The primary cause is the flexing of the teeth overtime.

Abfraction ...

Abfractions are small notches located just above or below the gum line. The primary cause is the flexing of the teeth overtime.

Broken Cusp

A broken cusp occurs by biting on something hard or can be due to tooth decay. If it is deep enough it may expose the tooth's middle layer of dentin, resulting in hypersensitivity.

Cracked Tooth (Oblique Supragingival)

An Oblique Supragingival fracture is a fracture which extends from the crown of the tooth to an area just above the gum line.

Cracked Tooth (Vertical Furcation)

A Vertical furcation fracture is a vertical fracture which extends down from the crown to where the roots of the tooth divide. This type of fracture may result in severe pain if left untreated.

Cracked Tooth (Oblique Root)

An Oblique root fracture occurs at the tooth's root. It is almost always located below the gums.

Cracked Tooth (Vertical Root)

A Vertical root fracture divides the root into two parts. A vertical fracture is commonly difficult to diagnose as it may not present any symptoms. Typically this type of fracture is managed through extraction.

Cracked Tooth (Vertical Apical)

A Vertical apical fracture occurs at the tip of the roots. This fracture is the most difficult to manage and can result in moderate to severe pain if left untreated.

Cracked Tooth at Amalgam

A fracture may occur to a tooth that has had restoration. One reason for this is the tooth being affected by decay which makes it much weaker than a virgin tooth.

Broken Cusp at Amalgam

As restorative materials such as amaigam cannot strengthen the remaining tooth structure, the cusp may fracture leading to dentin hypersensitivity.

Decay (Cervical) Cross Section

When tooth decay is left unchecked it may continue until it reaches the innermost layer of the tooth called the pulp. The deeper the cavity the more symptomatic or painful the tooth becomes.

Decay (Cervical)

All decay is as a result of the build up of plaque over time perhaps due to ineffective brushing. This plaque produces acid which can remove the tooth's enamel or cementum causing decay. Cervical decay occurs on the root of the tooth where it meets the crown.

Decay (Crown Margin)

All decay is as a result of the build up of plaque over time perhaps due to ineffective brushing. This plaque produces acid which can remove the tooth's enamel or cementum causing decay. Crown margin decay occurs at the point where the root of the tooth meets the crown.

Decay (Interproximal)

One of the most common sites for tooth decay is at the interproximal area or in the gap between teeth. Interproximal decay is commonly the result of not flossing between the teeth to remove plaque build-up.

Decay (Occlusal)

All decay is as a result of the build up of plaque which produces acid which can remove the tooth's enamel causing decay. Occlusal decay begins on the tooth's chewing surface in the grooves between the cusps.

Decay (Root)

Gum diseases can cause a gap to open between the tooth and gum. This allows bacteria to enter and cause decay of the roots thin surface layer called cementum.

Decay (Secondary)

Secondary caries or decay refers to decay that has begun around the margins of a previous filling.

Chipped teeth

In some cases of head trauma, the face may receive a powerful blow that may damage the teeth. Depending on the force, it may result in the teeth being forcibly removed from their sockets or just fractured or chipped.

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